Author Topic: Autism in Children.  (Read 2398 times)

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Offline CilmiSabca

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Autism in Children.
« on: September 15, 2011, 12:10:40 PM »
If your child hasn't been diagnosed as having a birth disorder but you've noticed symptoms associated the following problem, don't panic-- what you notice may indicate something far less serious than you're imagining. But do check with your baby's doctor. It may take more than a phone call to allay your fears; an examination or special testing may be necessary. If a problem does turn up, early recognition & prompt medical attention and therapy can often be benefial, even correct the problem completely.
   AUTISM
What is it?
An inability, that dates from birth or develops within the first two and half years of life, to develop normal human relationships, even with parents. Babies don't smile or respond to parents or anyone else in any way, and dislike being picked up or touched. There are usually extreme problems in speaking (including bizarre speech patterns such as echolalia, in which the child echoes the words just heard rather than replying), strange positions and mannerisms, erratic and inappropriate behavior (compulsiveness & ritualism, screaming fits & arm flapping), and, sometimes, self-destructiveness. The child may have normal intelligence but appear to be retarded or deaf because of lack of respondsiveness. Autism may sometimes be confused with child-hood schizophernia, and occasionally may precede it.
How common is it? There are an estimated 2 to 7 cases per 10,000 babies.*
Who is susceptible? Male children are three to four times more likely to be austistic than females.
What causes it?
Probably, according to a recent study, autosomal recessive inheritance: both parents must pass on recessive genes for the baby to be affected. There seem to be some differences in brain wave patterns in autistic children, which may be related to their condition. It is not related to parenting.
Related problems.
Behavior and developmental problems.
   TREATMENT.
At present there is no cure, but some children can be helped with behavior modification therapy, stimulation, special training, and, sometimes, drugs. When possible, the child remains at home, but sometimes the stress is more than a family can tolerate, and institutionalization becomes necessary. Day-care programs can sometimes help alleviate the stress while allowing the child to remain at home. Counseling is often helpful for the rest of the family.
   PROGNOSIS.
At present, about a third of children recover sufficiently to function fairly normally, but most remain autistic and need special institutional care. Outlook is best when a child can be taught to use meaningful speech before age five.
______
*Occasionally a child who seems to be autistic is helped by the elimination of foods to which he is allergic. smile or respond to parents or anyone else in any way, and dislike being picked up or touched. There are usually extreme problems in speaking (including bizarre speech patterns such as echolalia, in which the child echoes the words just heard rather than replying), strange positions and mannerisms, erratic and inappropriate behavior (compulsiveness & ritualism, screaming fits & arm flapping), and, sometimes, self-destructiveness. The child may have normal intelligence but appear to be retarded or deaf because of lack of respondsiveness. Autism may sometimes be confused with child-hood schizophernia, and occasionally may precede it.
How common is it? There are an estimated 2 to 7 cases per 10,000 babies.*
Who is susceptible? Male children are three to four times more likely to be austistic than females.
What causes it?
Probably, according to a recent study, autosomal recessive inheritance: both parents must pass on recessive genes for the baby to be affected. There seem to be some differences in brain wave patterns in autistic children, which may be related to their condition. It is not related to parenting.
Related problems.
Behavior and developmental problems.
   TREATMENT.
At present there is no cure, but some children can be helped with behavior modification therapy, stimulation, special training, and, sometimes, drugs. When possible, the child remains at home, but sometimes the stress is more than a family can tolerate, and institutionalization becomes necessary. Day-care programs can sometimes help alleviate the stress while allowing the child to remain at home. Counseling is often helpful for the rest of the family.
   PROGNOSIS.
At present, about a third of children recover sufficiently to function fairly normally, but most remain autistic and need special institutional care. Outlook is best when a child can be taught to use meaningful speech before age five.
______
*Occasionally a child who seems to be autistic is helped by the elimination of foods to which he is allergic.


Talo SAARO Allaah


 

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