Author Topic: New member - Sleep Technologist (Polysomnographic Tech)  (Read 52706 times)

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Offline Fiiltare

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New member - Sleep Technologist (Polysomnographic Tech)
« on: May 01, 2008, 10:31:22 AM »
Asalamu Aleykum Warahmatulaahi Wabarakaatu,

Wonderful site, I am new to this Somali Medical forum.

 4 yrs Sleep Technologist (Polysomnographic Tech), an allied health specialty that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders.

Thank you, Dr Mahdi and keep up the good work.



A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor's book

http://uwmedicine.washington.edu/


Offline Abdullahi!

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Re: New member
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2008, 07:19:00 PM »
Welcome Fiiltare to Somali Medical Forums

We are waiting forward to your contribution..

By the way could you tell us more about your field (Polysomnographic tech)?
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Offline Munim

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Re: New member
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2008, 08:00:11 PM »
W.S.W.W Fiiltare
Welcome to Somali Medical Forums we R happy to see u in the forum.
waiting your contribution.
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Offline Pharmacist

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Re: New member
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2008, 11:02:06 PM »
Welcome and join the big family...
Hope you enjoy your stay here
Pharmacist is highly-trained and skilled healthcare professional who perform various roles to ensure optimal health outcomes for his patients.

Offline Fiiltare

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Re: New member
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2008, 03:12:40 AM »
Thank you guys again,

Polysomnographic Technologist Performs, monitors and Scores sleep studies.
Patients with complaints of snoring (like my uncle) and Restless legs, Excessive Day time Sleepiness and
other sleep relating breathing disorders problems have overnight testing performed in sleep lab Hospitals.

Most people who snore loudly, gasp or stops breathing while they are sleeping may have sleep apnea, sleep apnea means (stop breathing when sleeping).

When pt consult with Doctor, they'll be send to spend the night @ the Hospital for diagnostic and treatment.

The Registered polysomngraphic tech will show his room, educate him about the test, start applying electrodes monitoring patient brain waves (EEG), patients Heart rate and rhythm(EKG), Muscles movements(EMG), breathing, airflow, Snoring, Chest and abdominal wall movements, Leg movements, and Oxygen level in the blood.

All these physiological parameters are going to send singal if any physiological pathological processes occur during sleep.

We also do PAP Treatment if patient was diagnosted with OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea) and we also conduct MSLT, MWT and scoring all those studies as well

It is great and I love it

A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor's book

http://uwmedicine.washington.edu/

Offline Abdullahi!

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Re: New member
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2008, 02:50:59 PM »
Thanks for the reply, this sounds interesting...
Is it a kind of subspeciality? and which category does it belong to?
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Offline Toldo

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Re: New member
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2008, 05:55:39 PM »
 welcome Mr. Fiiltare  and we are here so join us  and let us exchange everything..

Your job is wonderful and i liked it  , but this allied health science course is it new in The U.S ?  and what abt other countries  ,,   am in india still i havent seen such course and may be it is on the way .lool but it is really interesting subject.....

I have the problem of waking up at night , and going till the kitchen or the door with out knowing it ? or speaking something un understandable , sometimes loudly sometimes low ? or sitting on the bed and tell stories lol kkkk so what that called in medical term ? and have u seen such case ?  somaliga waxa lagu dhahaa  QARAW ....

Offline Doctoor

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Re: New member
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2008, 04:39:21 PM »
From Wikipedia:

Sleepwalking (also called somnambulism or noctambulism), under the larger category of parasomnias or sleep disorders is where the sufferer engages in activities that are normally associated with wakefulness while he or she is asleep or in a sleeplike state.

Sleepwalking is usually defined by, or involves the person affected apparently shifting from his or her prior sleeping position and moving around and performing normal actions as if awake (cleaning, walking and other activities).

Sleepwalkers are not conscious of their actions on a level where memory of the sleepwalking episode can be recalled, and because of this, unless the sleepwalker is woken or aroused by someone else, this sleep disorder can go unnoticed.

Sleepwalking is more commonly experienced in people with high levels of stress, anxiety or psychological factors and in people with genetic factors (family history) or sometimes a combination of both.

Visit here for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleepwalking

Offline Fiiltare

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Hypertension May Result from Poor Sleep Hapits, Leat to CVD
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2008, 11:51:08 PM »
Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia News Useful Links Video Library



Hypertension May Result From Poor Teen Sleep Habits, Lead To CVD
Main Category: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia
Also Included In: Pediatrics / Children's Health;  Hypertension;  Cardiovascular / Cardiology
Article Date: 20 Aug 2008 - 0:00 PDT

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Teenagers who don't sleep well or long enough may have a higher risk of elevated blood pressure that could lead to cardiovascular disease later in life, researchers report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Researchers found the odds of elevated blood pressure increased 3.5 times for those with low sleep efficiency and 2.5 times for those with sleeping periods of less than 6.5 hours, even after adjusting for gender, body mass index and socioeconomic status.

Adolescents with low sleep efficiency - those who have trouble falling to sleep at night or who wake up too early - had an average 4 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) higher systolic blood pressure compared to children with higher sleep efficiency.

The study of 238 (123 boys and 115 girls) 13-to 16-year-olds is the first to examine insufficient sleep and blood pressure in healthy adolescents.

"Our study underscores the high rate of poor quality and inadequate sleep in adolescence coupled with the risk of developing high blood pressure and other health problems," said Susan Redline, M.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study and professor of medicine and pediatrics and director of University Hospitals Sleep Center at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. "We also found that a low sleep efficiency may be more consistently associated with pre-hypertension than a shorter sleep period."

Researchers discovered that 14 percent of the adolescents had pre-hypertension or hypertension with blood pressures in the 90th percentile for their height, age and gender. Twenty-six percent of the participants had low sleep efficiency and 11 percent had an extremely short sleep duration of less than 6.5 hrs.

Nearly two-thirds of the adolescents with short sleep duration also had low sleep efficiency, while 27.9 percent of adolescents with low sleep efficiency also had short sleep duration.

Researchers measured participants' wrist movements at home for five to seven days and participants completed a daily sleep log to provide estimates of sleep patterns. Researchers also measured sleep quality in a sleep laboratory and took nine blood pressure readings in a two-day period.

Participants with less than 85 percent sleep efficiency in the lab had nearly three times the odds of elevated high blood pressure.

"These associations may have a large public health impact," Redline said. "Although the overall frequency of sleep insufficiency in children is unknown, our study's prevalence of 26 percent may be under-estimated due to the exclusion of children with known sleep disorders and other illnesses."

Hypertension has become an increasingly prevalent health problem in adults and adolescents. Childhood hypertension is associated with adult hypertension, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, end-organ damage and left ventricular hypertrophy (an enlargement of the heart's main pumping chamber).

"Part of the problem is the technological invasion of the bedroom with computers, cell phones and music," Redline said. "There are teens who text message or listen to music all night, compounded by early school hours. Adolescents need nine hours of sleep. Parents should optimize sleep quality for their family with regular sleep and wake times and bedrooms should be kept quiet, dark and conducive to sleep."

Researchers also found an increased prevalence of low sleep efficiency among the more "vulnerable population" such as poorer children and minorities. "These groups already are known to be at higher risk for hypertension and other adverse outcomes," Redline said. "Their high prevalence of poor sleep quality and deprivation could be due to disruptive home environments and neighborhoods, as well as unrecognized psychological and medical problems."

Redline said further research is needed to determine whether prevention of hypertension in children should not only include weight management and exercise, but optimization of sleep.

"Meanwhile, pediatricians should view sleep quality and patterns as an intervenable health concern," she said. "Our data underscores the need to monitor quality and quantity of sleep as part of a child's overall health strategy."

----------------------------
Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release.
----------------------------

The National Institutes of Health funded the study.

Co authors are: Sogol Javaheri B.A; Amy Storfer-Isser, M.S.; and Carol L. Rosen, M.D. Individual author disclosures can be found on the manuscript.

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association's policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-08/www.americanheart.org/corporatefunding.

NR08 1103 (Circ/Javaheri/Redline)

Source: Karen Astle
American Heart Association
A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor's book

http://uwmedicine.washington.edu/

Offline Fiiltare

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Worry And Sleepless Nights Increase Risk Of Diabetes In Men
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2008, 11:53:45 PM »
New research claims that psychological distress including anxiety, insomnia, depression, apathy and fatigue can more than double the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in older men.

Scientists looked at 2,127 men, born between 1938 and 1957, who had normal blood glucose levels. They determined their level of psychological distress both at the beginning and end of the study.

The men were tested for diabetes eight to ten years later and it was found that the men with the highest levels of psychological distress were 2.2 times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest levels. Altogether 103 men developed Type 2 diabetes.

The study also looked at 3,100 middle-aged women but found that there was not an increased risk of diabetes in those with high levels of psychological distress.

More research is needed

"It is intriguing that the increased risk of diabetes occurs in men only and it would be interesting to find out why. The results suggest that it could be due to a hormonal or behavioural influence. We already know from previous studies that stress is considered to be a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes and others have looked at the link between sleep disorders, such as insomnia, and the condition. This research appears to confirm that there might be something in this," said Dr Iain Frame, Director of Research at Diabetes UK.

"We know that risk factors which increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes are being white and over 40 years old, or of black or South Asian origin and over 25 years old, having a family member with the condition, being overweight and having high blood pressure. If you have two or more of these risk factors, you should see your GP for a simple test."

Other factors

Professor Anders Ekbom from the Unit of Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institute, Sweden, conducted the study. "Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the development of Type 2 diabetes. We already knew that psychological distress and depression are risk factors for heart disease and suspected they may play a part in developing Type 2 diabetes, which is corroborated by this research," he said.

"The link could be a result of the way psychological distress affects the brain's role in regulating hormones or perhaps because depression influences a person's diet and level of physical activity in a negative way."

The study was published in the journal 'Diabetic Medicine'.

A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor's book

http://uwmedicine.washington.edu/

Offline PrincessMuni

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Re: New member
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2008, 01:49:08 PM »
I tend to have the same problem, talking alot while sleeping
sometimes low sometimes loudly plus when someone enters the room
they're like Yesterday when u said this and that
and I am like WHAT? when did I say that?
so whats that problem? I need help... I heard it has something to do with
thinking before sleeping or that you need to calm down and read Holy Quran
the thing is that I never think at night in bed and I also read Holy Quran
so whats the problem medically?
Intelligence plus character- that is the goal of true education

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Offline Countess_Vampira

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Re: New member
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2008, 09:23:01 PM »
Ah, a fellow physiologist welcome. I was once close to becoming a perfusionist for those heart/lung transplant machines but thought better or if. Closest thing I've come to physiology since. The memories. Good times.

Offline Fiiltare

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Re: New member
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2009, 07:38:05 AM »
ABCs of ZZZZs -- When you Can't Sleep
 

Are You Getting all the ZZZs You Need?
Does it often take you more than 30 minutes to fall asleep at night? Or do you wake up frequently during the night — or too early in the morning — and have a hard time going back to sleep? When you awaken, do you feel groggy and lethargic? Do you feel drowsy during the day particularly during monotonous situations?

If you answered "yes" to any one of these questions, you may have a "sleep debt" that is affecting you in ways you don’t even realize. And, you aren’t alone. A recent NSF Sleep in America poll found that a majority of American adults experience sleep problems. However, few recognize the importance of adequate rest, or are aware that effective methods of preventing and managing sleep problems now exist.

Why Do You Need Sleep?
Sleep is not merely a “time out” from our busy routines; it is essential for good health, mental and emotional functioning and safety. For instance, researchers have found that people with chronic insomnia are more likely than others to develop several kinds of psychiatric problems, and are also likely to make greater use of healthcare services.

People suffering from a sleep disorder called sleep apnea are at risk for high blood pressure, heart attacks, stroke and motor vehicle crashes if left untreated.

Even occasional sleeping problems can make daily life feel more stressful or cause you to be less productive. In the NSF survey, those who said they had trouble getting enough sleep reported a greater difficulty concentrating, accomplishing required tasks and handling minor irritations. Overall, sleep loss has been found to impair the ability to perform tasks involving memory, learning, and logical reasoning. This may contribute to mistakes or unfulfilled potential at school or on the job and strained relationships at home. In fact, sleeplessness has been found to be a significant predictor of absenteeism. The direct and indirect impact of daytime sleepiness and sleep disorders on the national economy is estimated to be $100 billion annually.

Insufficient sleep can also be extremely dangerous, leading to serious or even fatal accidents. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has estimated more than 100,000 auto crashes annually are fatigue related. These drowsy driving crashes cause more than 1,500 deaths and tens of thousands of injuries and lasting disabilities. This problem has been found to affect drivers aged 25 or under more than any other age group.

How Much Sleep Is Enough?
Sleep needs vary. In general, most healthy adults need seven to nine hours of sleep a night. However, some individuals are able to function without sleepiness or drowsiness after as little as six hours of sleep. Others can’t perform at their peak unless they’ve slept ten hours. And, contrary to common myth, the need for sleep doesn’t decline with age(although the ability to get it all at one time may be reduced).

So, how do you measure how much sleep you truly need? If you have trouble staying alert during boring or monotonous situations when fatigue is often "unmasked" you probably aren’t getting enough good-quality sleep. Other signs are a tendency to be unreasonably irritable with co-workers, family or friends, and difficulty concentrating or remembering facts.

Is All Sleep the Same?
It may surprise you to learn that during the hours you seem to be "out cold," a lot is actually happening. Normal sleepers have a relatively predictable "sleep architecture," the term used to describe an alternating pattern of REM (rapid-eye-movement) and non-REM sleep. REM sleep is when you dream, and is characterized by a high level of mental and physical activity. In fact, your heart rate, blood pressure and breathing are similar to what you experience when you are awake.

Scientists define the best sleep as having the right mix of REM and non-REM sleep. Getting enough sleep without interruptions from your environment or from internal factors such as your breathing is more likely to maintain your natural sleep architecture and result in restful and restorative sleep.

Who's At Risk For Poor Sleep?
 

Virtually everyone suffers at least an occasional night of poor sleep. However, as the list of "sleep stealers" implies, certain individuals may be particularly vulnerable. These include students, shift workers, travelers, and persons suffering from acute stress, depression, or chronic pain. And employees working long hours or multiple jobs may find their sleep less refreshing.

Older adults also have frequent difficulty with sleep problems, but inadequate sleep is not an inevitable part of the aging process. The total amount of sleep needed isn’t reduced. However, many of the sleep stealers can combine in the elderly including impaired health, pain and increased use of medications.

Teenagers can have difficulty falling asleep until late at night and awakening early in the morning.

Many young adults keep relatively irregular hours and as a group they report higher rates of dissatisfaction with the sleep they are getting.

Being overweight increases the risk for sleep apnea.

What are the biggest "Sleep Stealers"?
 

Psychological Factors
Stress is considered by most sleep experts to be the No. 1 cause of short-term sleeping difficulties. Common triggers include school- or job-related pressures, a family or marriage problem, and a serious illness or death in the family. Usually the sleep problem disappears when the stressful situation passes. However, if shortterm sleep problems such as insomnia aren’t managed properly from the beginning, they can persist long after the original stress has passed.

That’s why it’s a good idea to talk to a physician about any sleeping problem that recurs or persists for longer than one week.

Your doctor can help you take steps early to control or prevent poor sleep. Since insomnia can also be brought on by depression, evaluation by a healthcare professional is essential.

Lifestyle Stressors
Without realizing it, you may be doing things during the day or night that can work against getting a good night’s sleep. These include drinking alcohol or beverages containing caffeine in the afternoon or evening, exercising close to bedtime, following an irregular morning and nighttime schedule, and working or doing other mentally intense activities right before or after getting into bed.

Shift Work
If you are among the 17 percent of employees in the United States who are shift workers, sleep may be particularly elusive. Shift work forces you to try to sleep when activities around you — and your own "biological rhythms" — signal you to be awake. One study shows that shift workers are two to five times more likely than employees with regular, daytime hours to fall asleep on the job.

Jet Lag
Still another sleep stealer is jet lag, an inability to sleep caused when you travel across several time zones and your biological rhythms get "out of sync."

Environmental Interferences
A distracting sleep environment such as a room that's too hot or cold, too noisy or too brightly lit can be a barrier to sound sleep. And interruptions from children or other family members can also disrupt sleep. Other influences to pay attention to are the comfort and size of your bed and the habits of your sleep partner. If you have to lie beside someone who has different sleep preferences, snores, can't fall or stay asleep, or has other sleep difficulties, it often becomes your problem too!

Physical Factors
A number of physical problems can interfere with your ability to fall or stay asleep. For example, arthritis and other conditions that cause pain, backache, or discomfort can make it difficult to sleep well. Sleep apnea, which is recognized by snoring and interrupted breathing, causes brief awakenings (often unnoticed) and excessive daytime sleepiness. If suspected, a person having signs of sleep apnea should see a doctor.

Disorders that cause involuntary limb movements during sleep, such as Restless Legs Syndrome, break up the normal sleep pattern and are also likely to make sleep less refreshing and result in daytime sleepiness.

For women, pregnancy and hormonal shifts including those that cause premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or menopause and its accompanying hot flashes can also intrude on sleep.

Medications
In addition, certain medications such as decongestants, steroids and some medicines for high blood pressure, asthma, or depression can cause sleeping difficulties as a side effect.

So, What's The Secret To Good Sleep?
 

If you are having a sleep problem or feel sleepy during the day, a visit with your doctor is the best first step. Your doctor will first want to ascertain whether there are any underlying problems that are contributing to or causing your sleep problem.

In many cases, your doctor will be able to recommend lifestyle changes that can help promote sleep. Keep in mind that what works for some individuals may not work for others. So, your best bet is to find out what’s effective for you and stick with it. In general, try to build into your schedule time for eight hours of sleep, and follow this routine as regularly as possible. Even on the weekends. Here are a few tips many people have found to be useful.

* Avoid caffeine, nicotine and alcohol in the late afternoon and evening. Caffeine and nicotine can delay your sleep, and alcohol may interrupt your sleep later in the night.

* Exercise regularly, but do so at least three hours before bedtime. A workout after that time may actually keep you awake because your body has not had a chance to cool down.

* Don't use your bed for anything other than sleep or sex. Your bed should be associated with sleep.

* If you have trouble sleeping when you go to bed, don’t nap during the day, since it affects your ability to sleep at night.

* Don't use your bed for anything other than sleep or sex. Your bed should be associated with sleep.

* Consider your sleep environment. Make it as pleasant, comfortable, dark and quiet as you can.

* Establish a regular, relaxing bedtime routine that will allow you to unwind and send a "signal" to your brain that it’s time to sleep. Avoiding exposure to bright light before bedtime and taking a hot bath may help.

* If you can’t go to sleep after 30 minutes, don’t stay in bed tossing and turning. Get up and involve yourself in a relaxing activity, such as listening to soothing music or reading, until you feel sleepy. Remember: Try to clear your mind; don’t use this time to solve your daily problems.

When Do You Need to Seek Help?
 

If your sleep problems persist for longer than a week and are bothersome, or if sleepiness interferes with the way you feel or function during the day, a doctor’s help may be needed. To get the most out of your doctor’s visit, you’ll find that it is often helpful to keep a diary of your sleep habits for about ten days to identify just how much sleep you’re getting over a period of time and what you may be doing to interfere with it. It can help you document your problem in a way that your physician can best understand.

If the problem is the time it takes to fall asleep, staying asleep or waking up unrefreshed, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes or behavioral approaches to treating the problem. However, lifestyle changes alone may not be enough. Treating insomnia with medication is the most common treatment for these sleep problems. In most cases, medication is only used until the immediate stressor is under control or lifestyle changes have had a chance to work.

While many individuals will try an over-the-counter medicine to help them sleep, these should be taken with caution. Your physician or pharmacist can help inform you about the different types of medications available and which would be most effective for you. Alcohol should not be used as a sleep aid.

For sleep apnea or other sleep disorders, your doctor may want to do a sleep study that will provide more information about your sleep pattern and whether you are breathing regularly while you sleep.

The bottom line is this: Adequate sleep is as essential to health and peak performance as exercise and good nutrition. If you aren’t getting enough, talk to your physician. You deserve it.
 
A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor's book

http://uwmedicine.washington.edu/

Offline Fiiltare

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Re: New member
« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2010, 08:46:03 PM »
Lack of Sleep and Impotence - Are You Killing Your Sex Drive?

So what does lack of sleep and impotence have to do with each other? Try thinking a whole lot. Your body can only run properly if you give it everything that it needs. Think of your body as a car. Your car will only run as long as you keep the maintenance up on it. It is time to find out the link between these two.
First off, every man hates it when he is in the mood,but he can not seem to rise to the occasion. This has to be one of the most embarrassing things a man can go through. Especially after a having a great evening with the one they care about. You had the great dinner and the movie was excellent. You finally end up at your place and you have everything set. So she hints that she is tired and rather lay down. You take this as a clue that this is your time to pleasure yourself and her.
Then you make your way to the bedroom and right before your passionate kissing turns into a scene out of a movie. She reaches down realizes you are not physical in the mood. She begins to question what is wrong? You have to sadly reply that you can not do your part.
No one wants to be in this position. So do not put yourself in that potential mess. This is how lack of sleep and impotence can affect you. You can avoid this by simply resting properly the night before. This will give your body all the necessary charging time that you need to rejuvenate and be ready to perform.
I am so glad that now this is a problem of the past for me now.No more awkward bedroom moments for me. Just taking these simple steps made my life in bed a lot nicer. Click here now to find out for free like I did ==> http://www.biggermalenow.com <==
Seriously what do you have to lose? I know I was tired of not being able to perform for my partner and our relationship suffered greatly because of it. Take these simple steps and learn how to avoid what I had to go through. Go here now for great time in bed.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_Card


A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor's book

http://uwmedicine.washington.edu/

Offline Chi-chi

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Re: New member
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2010, 09:21:34 PM »


Hi Dr., thank you for making this website because this will definitely helps me in my studies..I will be a nursing student soon. I will share it to my classmates, teachers and friends. You're doing a great job  here..keep it up and many people would really appreciate you for doing this for everyone.

Again, thank you very much!

Sincerely,
Chichi





Asalamu Aleykum Warahmatulaahi Wabarakaatu,

Wonderful site, I am new to this Somali Medical forum.

 4 yrs Sleep Technologist (Polysomnographic Tech), an allied health specialty that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders.

Thank you, Dr Mahdi and keep up the good work.




 

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